Blogs

2 weeks 1 day ago

Are Changes on the Way for Bankruptcy and Student Loans? There’s one big change Joe Biden can make (without Congress) so people who can’t afford to pay their student loans can clear them in bankruptcy. During his presidential campaign, Joe Biden promised to help people who can’t pay their student loans.  So far, he’s helped […]
The post Are Changes on the Way for Bankruptcy and Student Loans? by Robert Weed appeared first on Northern VA Bankruptcy Lawyer Robert Weed.


2 weeks 3 days ago

Are Changes on the Way for Bankruptcy and Student Loans? There’s one big change Joe Biden can make (without Congress) so people who can’t afford to pay their student loans can clear them in bankruptcy. During his presidential campaign, Joe Biden promised to help people who can’t pay their student loans.  So far, he’s helped […]
The post Are Changes on the Way for Bankruptcy and Student Loans? by Robert Weed appeared first on Northern VA Bankruptcy Lawyer Robert Weed.


5 days 10 hours ago

Colonial Bankruptcy Laws
In the American colonial era, many of the states had bankruptcy and insolvency laws. Imprisonment for debt was commonplace.

Bankruptcy Act of 1800
The first federal bankruptcy law was passed by Congress in 1800, eleven years after the ratification of the United States Constitution. This Bankruptcy Act was designed to be a temporary measure and was repealed after only three years.

This act was virtually a copy of the existing English law, which was the 1732 Statute of George II. The English laws maintained a distinction between "bankruptcy laws" and "involvency" laws. Bankruptcy law generally involved involuntary proceedings against business trader while involvency law addressed concerns of debt relief generally, including the release from debtor's prison.

Bankruptcy Act of 1841
Following the financial Panic of 1837, the Bankruptcy Act of 1841 was passed. It provided for both involuntary and voluntary bankruptcy. This act allowed a person some basic exemptions of property, but state exemptions were not available.  Although the act worked well, creditors considered it a failure and it was repealed in 1843.  The 1841 Act though was important in that it established the allowance of voluntary bankruptcy for all debtors.Jordan E. Bublick - Miami Bankruptcy Lawyer - North Miami & Kendall Offices - (305) 891-4055 - www.bublicklaw.com


5 days 10 hours ago

Colonial Bankruptcy Laws
In the American colonial era, many of the states had bankruptcy and insolvency laws. Imprisonment for debt was commonplace.

Bankruptcy Act of 1800
The first federal bankruptcy law was passed by Congress in 1800, eleven years after the ratification of the United States Constitution. This Bankruptcy Act was designed to be a temporary measure and was repealed after only three years.

This act was virtually a copy of the existing English law, which was the 1732 Statute of George II. The English laws maintained a distinction between "bankruptcy laws" and "involvency" laws. Bankruptcy law generally involved involuntary proceedings against business trader while involvency law addressed concerns of debt relief generally, including the release from debtor's prison.

Bankruptcy Act of 1841
Following the financial Panic of 1837, the Bankruptcy Act of 1841 was passed. It provided for both involuntary and voluntary bankruptcy. This act allowed a person some basic exemptions of property, but state exemptions were not available.  Although the act worked well, creditors considered it a failure and it was repealed in 1843.  The 1841 Act though was important in that it established the allowance of voluntary bankruptcy for all debtors.Jordan E. Bublick - Miami Bankruptcy Lawyer - North Miami & Kendall Offices - (305) 891-4055 - www.bublicklaw.com


4 weeks 8 hours ago

 Bloomberg Law has an interesting post about InfoWars Case Spotlights Limits of Small Business Bankruptcy Law and Subchapter V small business chapter 11 filings. The article can be found at https://lnkd.in/gFH7fJE8Persons with questions about Subchapter V should contact
Jim Shenwick, Esq. 212 541 6224 [email protected]


1 month 5 hours ago

A new announcement has just been submitted by the Clerk of the United States bankruptcy Court for the Northern District of Illinois. Going forward in the post-Covid future, the outlying collar county court calls will no longer be heard in those collar counties. The matters will be heard via Zoom for Government or a party+ Read More
The post Bankruptcy Matters For The Collar Counties To Be Heard In Chicago appeared first on David M. Siegel.


1 month 2 days ago

The recently passed Consumer Credit Fairness Act (“CCFA”) instituted some wide-sweeping, and much needed, reforms in the debt collection practice in New York State. First and foremost, the New York Statute of Limitations (“SOL”) for commencing a debt collection lawsuit was reduced from 6 years to 3 years, effective April 7, 2022. Other portions of Read More


1 month 3 days ago

 The 9th Circuit Bankruptcy BAP has ruled in RS Air, LLC that a profit motive is not required for a debtor to qualify for Subchapter V relief. An article about this case can be found at https://www.jdsupra.com/legalnews/profit-motive-not-required-for-9954771...

Jim Shenwick, Esq.  212 541 6224   [email protected]


1 month 4 days ago

five-starTop Notch Representation, Personalized Service! T.M.
Diane Drain personally answers her incoming calls! Every individual has their own specific reasons for seeking bankruptcy protection. I enlisted Ms. Drain’s assistance and from that first consult I realized that this was not your typical “legal factory” churning out client cases. Following my discharge and reflecting back, her biggest strength and your most viable asset is her knowledge of the bankruptcy process. Her tenacious commitment to the prework stage (planning and preparation) is paramount to your case’s success. I’ve found her to be compassionate, yet an Arizona “straight shooter” when it came to directing my case.
Thank you, Diane and Jay for the seamless process you provided me! T.M.
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The post Top Notch Representation, Personalized Service appeared first on Diane L. Drain - Phoenix Arizona Bankruptcy Attorney.


1 month 1 week ago

 A very information article about Subchapter V Bankruptcy for small businesses can be found at https://blogs.lawyers.com/attorney/bankruptcy/can-you-benefit-from-small...
The article is titled Can You Benefit From Small Business Bankruptcy Under Subchapter V? by Adrienne Woods
Any attorneys or clients that have questions about Subchapter V can contact Jim Shenwick, Esq at 212 541 6224 [email protected]


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