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1 day 7 hours ago

A powerful story from one man who refused to be bullied to one of the devious debt collectors:
Millions Are Hounded for Debt They Don’t Owe. One Victim Fought Back, With a Vengeance
Andrew Therrien wanted payback. He got it—and uncovered a conspiracy.  “It begins when someone scoops up troves of personal information that are available cheaply online—old loan applications, long-expired obligations, data from hacked accounts—and reformats it to look like a list of debts. Then they make deals with unscrupulous collectors who will demand repayment of the fictitious bills. Their targets are often poor and likely to already be getting confusing calls about other loans. The harassment usually doesn’t work, but some marks are convinced that because the collectors know so much, the debt must be real.

The problem is as simple as it is intractable. In 2012 a call center in India was busted for making 8 million calls in eight months to collect made-up bills. The Federal Trade Commission has since broken up at least 13 similar scams. In most cases, regulators weren’t able to identify the original perpetrators because the data files had been sold and repackaged so many times. Victims have essentially no recourse to do anything but take the abuse.”

This article goes on in detail about the years that Therrien spent tracking down the frauds and international schemes.  In May 2016, Therrien emailed his discoveries to the FTC. A lawyer replied right away: “Andrew, we need to talk about this.” Therrien also gave his intel to some private lawyers who were going after Tucker in Texas. They contacted Harsh, and in August 2016 he submitted an affidavit to the court. Harsh, who declined to comment for this story, testified that Tucker had asked him to manipulate a database of almost 8 million payday-loan applications, writing in a made-up lender and adding an amount owed of $300 for each person.

.fusion-body .fusion-builder-column-1{width:100% !important;margin-top : 0px;margin-bottom : 0px;}.fusion-builder-column-1 > .fusion-column-wrapper {padding-top : 0px !important;padding-right : 0px !important;margin-right : 1.92%;padding-bottom : 0px !important;padding-left : 0px !important;margin-left : 1.92%;}@media only screen and (max-width:980px) {.fusion-body .fusion-builder-column-1{width:100% !important;}.fusion-builder-column-1 > .fusion-column-wrapper {margin-right : 1.92%;margin-left : 1.92%;}}@media only screen and (max-width:640px) {.fusion-body .fusion-builder-column-1{width:100% !important;}.fusion-builder-column-1 > .fusion-column-wrapper {margin-right : 1.92%;margin-left : 1.92%;}}@media only screen and (max-width:980px) {.fusion-title.fusion-title-1{margin-top:15px!important;margin-bottom:0px!important;}}@media only screen and (max-width:640px) {.fusion-title.fusion-title-1{margin-top:10px!important;margin-bottom:10px!important;}}MUSINGS BY DIANE:If you read the article above you will see it took one man years to expose this on-going conspiracy of mass fraud on our friends, relatives, and, perhaps, ourselves.  Tucker (the founder of this scam) is a sorry human being.  He whines that he is tired of being attacked, yet he never takes ownership that he caused this mess.  He hurt thousands of others who did not have the energy to do what Therrien did for the rest of us.  We should all send our thanks to Andrew Therrien for looking out for us and bringing a few bad guys to justice. 
@media only screen and (max-width:980px) {.fusion-title.fusion-title-2{margin-top:0px!important;margin-bottom:6px!important;}}@media only screen and (max-width:640px) {.fusion-title.fusion-title-2{margin-top:10px!important;margin-bottom:10px!important;}}– Diane L. Drain.fusion-body .fusion-builder-column-2{width:100% !important;margin-top : 0px;margin-bottom : 0px;}.fusion-builder-column-2 > .fusion-column-wrapper {padding-top : 0px !important;padding-right : 30px !important;margin-right : 1.92%;padding-bottom : 0px !important;padding-left : 45px !important;margin-left : 1.92%;}@media only screen and (max-width:980px) {.fusion-body .fusion-builder-column-2{width:100% !important;order : 0;}.fusion-builder-column-2 > .fusion-column-wrapper {margin-right : 1.92%;margin-left : 1.92%;}}@media only screen and (max-width:640px) {.fusion-body .fusion-builder-column-2{width:100% !important;order : 0;}.fusion-builder-column-2 > .fusion-column-wrapper {margin-right : 1.92%;margin-left : 1.92%;}}.fusion-body .fusion-flex-container.fusion-builder-row-2{ padding-top : 0px;margin-top : 0px;padding-right : 0px;padding-bottom : 0px;margin-bottom : 0px;padding-left : 0px;}.fusion-button.button-1 {border-radius:10px;}.fusion-button.button-1.button-3d{-webkit-box-shadow: inset 0px 1px 0px #fff,0px 5px 0px #003d00,1px 7px 7px 3px rgba(0,0,0,0.3);-moz-box-shadow: inset 0px 1px 0px #fff,0px 5px 0px #003d00,1px 7px 7px 3px rgba(0,0,0,0.3);box-shadow: inset 0px 1px 0px #fff,0px 5px 0px #003d00,1px 7px 7px 3px rgba(0,0,0,0.3);}.button-1.button-3d:active{-webkit-box-shadow: inset 0px 1px 0px #fff,0px 5px 0px #003d00,1px 7px 7px 3px rgba(0,0,0,0.3);-moz-box-shadow: inset 0px 1px 0px #fff,0px 5px 0px #003d00,1px 7px 7px 3px rgba(0,0,0,0.3);box-shadow: inset 0px 1px 0px #fff,0px 5px 0px #003d00,1px 7px 7px 3px rgba(0,0,0,0.3);}Click here for steps to your free bankruptcy consultation
.fusion-body .fusion-builder-column-4{width:25% !important;margin-top : 0px;margin-bottom : 20px;}.fusion-builder-column-4 > .fusion-column-wrapper {padding-top : 0px !important;padding-right : 0px !important;margin-right : 10px;padding-bottom : 0px !important;padding-left : 0px !important;margin-left : 10px;}@media only screen and (max-width:980px) {.fusion-body .fusion-builder-column-4{width:100% !important;order : 0;}.fusion-builder-column-4 > .fusion-column-wrapper {margin-right : 10px;margin-left : 10px;}}@media only screen and (max-width:640px) {.fusion-body .fusion-builder-column-4{width:100% !important;order : 0;}.fusion-builder-column-4 > .fusion-column-wrapper {margin-right : 10px;margin-left : 10px;}}

.fusion-body .fusion-builder-column-5{width:75% !important;margin-top : 0px;margin-bottom : 20px;}.fusion-builder-column-5 > .fusion-column-wrapper {padding-top : 0px !important;padding-right : 15px !important;margin-right : 10px;padding-bottom : 0px !important;padding-left : 15px !important;margin-left : 10px;}@media only screen and (max-width:980px) {.fusion-body .fusion-builder-column-5{width:100% !important;order : 0;}.fusion-builder-column-5 > .fusion-column-wrapper {margin-right : 10px;margin-left : 10px;}}@media only screen and (max-width:640px) {.fusion-body .fusion-builder-column-5{width:100% !important;order : 0;}.fusion-builder-column-5 > .fusion-column-wrapper {margin-right : 10px;margin-left : 10px;}}.fusion-body .fusion-flex-container.fusion-builder-row-4{ padding-top : 0px;margin-top : 5;padding-right : 0px;padding-bottom : 0px;margin-bottom : 20px;padding-left : 0px;}
The post Millions Are Hounded for Debt They Don’t Owe appeared first on Diane L. Drain - Phoenix Arizona Bankruptcy Attorney.


3 days 7 hours ago

five-star“I couldn’t have done it — wouldn’t have dreamed of even trying — without you and Jay. You’re the very best!D.C.

For a review I decided to do something a little different, which is to adapt my last email letter because it illustrates my elation and good spirits after completing the bankruptcy experience with the noble assistance and guidance of Diane and Jay:  “Hi Diane, thank you for the two recent emails: ‘Good news — your discharge was entered,’ and especially this one, ‘Great news — your case is now closed!’  Hallelujah, I just love it so! Thank you so much for your diligent work and wise guidance all along the way. Now to think of a proper celebration, in the spirit of your ‘fireworks’ email. For starters, I just might take my dogs (my spirit warriors) through the Dairy Queen drive-thru where they have free ‘pup cups’ for any dogs on board (as well as a Blizzard with my name on it, no doubt!) Also, now that it’s all over but the shouting, you can count on me for a very favorable review, as well. I couldn’t have done it — wouldn’t have dreamed of even trying — without you and Jay. You’re the very best! Thanks again!” Respectfully, D.C.

 
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The post I couldn’t have done it — wouldn’t have dreamed of even trying — without you and Jay. You’re the very best! appeared first on Diane L. Drain - Phoenix Arizona Bankruptcy Attorney.


5 days 22 hours ago

Declaring bankruptcy is not an easy decision to make. It happens when a person or a company fails to pay back its financial obligations to creditors. Some individuals believe that bankruptcy is the only way for them to stay out of debt.
One of the common types of bankruptcy is Chapter 13. It is also called the wage earner’s plan. If you decide to declare bankruptcy under this chapter, you will be given a period of three to five years to pay back and reorganize your existing debts to the creditor. This chapter does not require liquidation of assets. Hence, you will have the chance to save your assets such as a house or car from foreclosure. Moreover, you will be protected from co-signers and third parties who are accountable to the borrower toward unpaid consumer debts.
A designated Chapter 13 trustee will guide you throughout the whole bankruptcy process. He or she needs to carry out specific duties and obligations as you file for bankruptcy. Your United States trustee acts as the mediator between you and any creditor concerned.
Chapter 13 TrusteeThe first task that needs to be done is to review your bankruptcy paperwork. It should comply with the bankruptcy rules. The bankruptcy trustee must cross-check your Chapter 13 bankruptcy repayment plan. He or she will help you in restructuring your plan since it needs to be fair for both the creditor and the debtor. It should explain how you plan to repay your debts. The trustee needs to check all the bankruptcy forms that you have filed from the start of the case. He or she needs to ensure the accuracy of all the figures declared in those forms. You need to provide supporting documents such as bank statements, bank account details, tax returns, and most recent payslips. These are needed to confirm your monthly income, personal properties, debts, living expenses, credit score, assets, and liabilities. All these details should be thoroughly checked before proceeding to the next step.
After one month from the bankruptcy filing date, your trustee will set up a 341 meeting with you and your creditors. The queries are usually relevant to your assets, liabilities, income, and other related information about your finances. While under oath, you will be asked several questions regarding your bankruptcy plan and paperwork. If there is a need for further verification, the trustee will organize another meeting.
If the United States bankruptcy court will not approve your bankruptcy petition, you will be given a time frame to make amendments to your plan and to correct the conflicts. Your trustee will be responsible to oversee bankruptcy hearings. He or she will ensure the feasibility of your plan and will negotiate with the judge. After the confirmation hearing, the bankruptcy judge will decide whether your plan should be approved or denied.
Furthermore, the trustee is also liable to object to any fraudulent claims. Within 70 days from the filing date, a creditor will submit a “proof of claim” to court. This proof declares the total amount that you owe. Your trustee needs to ensure that this claim is sufficiently supported by legal documents.
Another duty of a trustee Is to collect and manage the repayment plan. You need to give monthly payments to your trustee 30 days from the date of filing Chapter 13. Once you obtain the court order confirming the approval of your plan, the collected fund will be distributed by your trustee to pay your creditors. This will be done according to the terms and conditions of the payment plan. He will help you during the process of debt settlement. This bankruptcy chapter will last for about three to five years. Within this period, the trustee will still collect payments from you and use them to pay off the debts that you owed. All the transactions will be recorded accurately.
Filing for bankruptcy takes a lot of time and effort. It does not happen in a snap of a finger. You might experience hardship and failure. It is a gradual process that will help you solve your financial problems one step at a time. For inquiries and legal bankruptcy advice, do not hesitate to contact us at Northwest Debt Relief Law Firm and schedule a consultation with our experienced bankruptcy lawyers.
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The post Trusting a Trustee: The Role of a Chapter 13 Trustee appeared first on Vancouver Bankruptcy Attorney | Northwest Debt Relief Law Firm.


5 days 22 hours ago

If you are behind on your mortgage, beware of mortgage relief scams.
mortgage scamThere is free foreclosure help. If anyone tries to charge you in advance for help or guarantees that they can stop your foreclosure, they’re not legitimate.
mortgage scamHere are some red flags that can help you spot and avoid mortgage relief scams:

  • You’re asked to pay up front for help.
  • The company guarantees it will get the terms of your mortgage changed.
  • The company guarantees you won’t lose your home.
  • You’re instructed to send your payment to someone other than your mortgage company or servicer.
  • You’re told to stop paying your mortgage.
  • The company says they’re affiliated with the government or uses a logo that looks like a government seal but is slightly different.

mortgage scamIf you see one of these warning signs, take your business elsewhere. The CFPB has information on how you can avoid foreclosure and tips for working with your mortgage servicer.
Knowing your rights under the CARES Act and guidance from the US Department of Housing and Urban Development also can help you avoid mortgage relief scams. If you experience financial hardship due to the COVID-19 pandemic, you may have a right to temporarily pause or reduce your monthly mortgage payments through a forbearance. Servicers also may not be allowed to foreclose on your home. For more information on COVID housing protections and important deadlines, visit consumerfinance.gov/housing.

Some more posts
Twitter:
Want to know about your options for housing relief during the COVID pandemic? Check out consumerfinance.gov/housing via @CFPB.
Avoid foreclosure rescue scams. Know your rights. Learn more at consumerfinance.gov/housing via @CFPB.
Need help with your mortgage? Here are four things you should know: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ahSICkautsk via @CFPB
Mortgage loan modification scams are schemes to take your money – often by making a false promise of saving you from foreclosure. Learn more: https://www.consumerfinance.gov/ask-cfpb/what-are-mortgage-loan-modification-scams-en-272 via @CFPB
Not sure where to go for mortgage help? Find a housing counselor: consumerfinance.gov/mortgagehelp/ via @CFPB
Facebook:
Knowing your rights under the CARES Act and guidance from the US Department of Housing and Urban Development can help you avoid mortgage relief scams. If you experience financial hardship due to the COVID-19 pandemic, you may have a right to temporarily pause or reduce your monthly mortgage payments through a forbearance. Servicers also may not be allowed to foreclose on your home. via @Consumer Financial Protection Bureau consumerfinance.gov/housing.
mortgage scamIf you are behind on your mortgage due to the COVID-19 pandemic, beware of mortgage relief scams. There are free relief options that can pause or reduce your monthly mortgage payments and stop a foreclosure. If anyone tries to charge you in advance for help or guarantees that they can stop your foreclosure, they’re not legitimate. via @Consumer Financial Protection Bureau consumerfinance.gov/housing.
Thank you for your help in spreading the word. For more resources for you and your clients, we have tools and programs that encourage financial education and capability from childhood through retirement.
Thank you,
Consumer Financial Protection Bureau 

.fusion-body .fusion-builder-column-1{width:100% !important;margin-top : 0px;margin-bottom : 0px;}.fusion-builder-column-1 > .fusion-column-wrapper {padding-top : 0px !important;padding-right : 0px !important;margin-right : 1.92%;padding-bottom : 0px !important;padding-left : 0px !important;margin-left : 1.92%;}@media only screen and (max-width:980px) {.fusion-body .fusion-builder-column-1{width:100% !important;}.fusion-builder-column-1 > .fusion-column-wrapper {margin-right : 1.92%;margin-left : 1.92%;}}@media only screen and (max-width:640px) {.fusion-body .fusion-builder-column-1{width:100% !important;}.fusion-builder-column-1 > .fusion-column-wrapper {margin-right : 1.92%;margin-left : 1.92%;}}@media only screen and (max-width:980px) {.fusion-title.fusion-title-1{margin-top:15px!important;margin-bottom:0px!important;}}@media only screen and (max-width:640px) {.fusion-title.fusion-title-1{margin-top:10px!important;margin-bottom:10px!important;}}MUSINGS BY DIANE:mortgage scamIt is not enough that COVID has forced us to cut ourselves off from our family and friends (at least those who really care about their family and friends), but now con-artists have decided to scam homeowners who are having problems paying for their home during COVID.  It is a fact that bad events bring out bad actors.  After a tornado or other disaster thieves hit the streets ready to take naive homeowner’s insurance proceeds that are supposed to be used for repairing the house.  Or some creep offers a miraculous cure for a deadly disease such as COVID or cancer (such as drinking bleach or some other crack-pot idea).  All you have to do is give them your life savings. 
Be very cautious when relying on advice from someone who stands to make money from your ignorance.  Research, research and then research some more in order to find the truth.  NEVER assume the best answer is on the Internet.  Instead, talking with a professional who is experienced in the relevant area is your best option.  The last step is to trust yourself – if it sounds to good to be true – then it is.

@media only screen and (max-width:980px) {.fusion-title.fusion-title-2{margin-top:0px!important;margin-bottom:6px!important;}}@media only screen and (max-width:640px) {.fusion-title.fusion-title-2{margin-top:10px!important;margin-bottom:10px!important;}}– Diane L. Drain.fusion-body .fusion-builder-column-2{width:100% !important;margin-top : 0px;margin-bottom : 0px;}.fusion-builder-column-2 > .fusion-column-wrapper {padding-top : 0px !important;padding-right : 30px !important;margin-right : 1.92%;padding-bottom : 0px !important;padding-left : 45px !important;margin-left : 1.92%;}@media only screen and (max-width:980px) {.fusion-body .fusion-builder-column-2{width:100% !important;order : 0;}.fusion-builder-column-2 > .fusion-column-wrapper {margin-right : 1.92%;margin-left : 1.92%;}}@media only screen and (max-width:640px) {.fusion-body .fusion-builder-column-2{width:100% !important;order : 0;}.fusion-builder-column-2 > .fusion-column-wrapper {margin-right : 1.92%;margin-left : 1.92%;}}.fusion-body .fusion-flex-container.fusion-builder-row-2{ padding-top : 0px;margin-top : 0px;padding-right : 0px;padding-bottom : 0px;margin-bottom : 0px;padding-left : 0px;}.fusion-button.button-1 {border-radius:10px;}.fusion-button.button-1.button-3d{-webkit-box-shadow: inset 0px 1px 0px #fff,0px 5px 0px #003d00,1px 7px 7px 3px rgba(0,0,0,0.3);-moz-box-shadow: inset 0px 1px 0px #fff,0px 5px 0px #003d00,1px 7px 7px 3px rgba(0,0,0,0.3);box-shadow: inset 0px 1px 0px #fff,0px 5px 0px #003d00,1px 7px 7px 3px rgba(0,0,0,0.3);}.button-1.button-3d:active{-webkit-box-shadow: inset 0px 1px 0px #fff,0px 5px 0px #003d00,1px 7px 7px 3px rgba(0,0,0,0.3);-moz-box-shadow: inset 0px 1px 0px #fff,0px 5px 0px #003d00,1px 7px 7px 3px rgba(0,0,0,0.3);box-shadow: inset 0px 1px 0px #fff,0px 5px 0px #003d00,1px 7px 7px 3px rgba(0,0,0,0.3);}Click here for steps to your free bankruptcy consultation
.fusion-body .fusion-builder-column-4{width:25% !important;margin-top : 0px;margin-bottom : 20px;}.fusion-builder-column-4 > .fusion-column-wrapper {padding-top : 0px !important;padding-right : 0px !important;margin-right : 10px;padding-bottom : 0px !important;padding-left : 0px !important;margin-left : 10px;}@media only screen and (max-width:980px) {.fusion-body .fusion-builder-column-4{width:100% !important;order : 0;}.fusion-builder-column-4 > .fusion-column-wrapper {margin-right : 10px;margin-left : 10px;}}@media only screen and (max-width:640px) {.fusion-body .fusion-builder-column-4{width:100% !important;order : 0;}.fusion-builder-column-4 > .fusion-column-wrapper {margin-right : 10px;margin-left : 10px;}}

.fusion-body .fusion-builder-column-5{width:75% !important;margin-top : 0px;margin-bottom : 20px;}.fusion-builder-column-5 > .fusion-column-wrapper {padding-top : 0px !important;padding-right : 15px !important;margin-right : 10px;padding-bottom : 0px !important;padding-left : 15px !important;margin-left : 10px;}@media only screen and (max-width:980px) {.fusion-body .fusion-builder-column-5{width:100% !important;order : 0;}.fusion-builder-column-5 > .fusion-column-wrapper {margin-right : 10px;margin-left : 10px;}}@media only screen and (max-width:640px) {.fusion-body .fusion-builder-column-5{width:100% !important;order : 0;}.fusion-builder-column-5 > .fusion-column-wrapper {margin-right : 10px;margin-left : 10px;}}.fusion-body .fusion-flex-container.fusion-builder-row-4{ padding-top : 0px;margin-top : 5;padding-right : 0px;padding-bottom : 0px;margin-bottom : 20px;padding-left : 0px;}
The post Avoid COVID Mortgage Relief Scams appeared first on Diane L. Drain - Phoenix Arizona Bankruptcy Attorney.


1 week 1 day ago

Some people understand the difference between Chapter 7 and Chapter 13 bankruptcies in California. In Chapter 7, a debtor can wipe out most of their debt without paying their creditors a dime. On the other hand, in Chapter 13, a petitioner will pay a portion or all their debt. One of the primary factors a […]
The post Does Filing Bankruptcy in California Take All of Your Disposable Income? appeared first on The Bankruptcy Group, P.C..


1 week 1 day ago

People worry about debt. They also worry about their credit score. One of the reasons people facing a difficult financial crisis avoid bankruptcy is because they are worried about its effect on their credit score and credit report in the future. However, while filing for Chapter 7 might lower your credit score in the short-term, […]
The post What is the Average Credit Score After Filing Chapter 7? appeared first on The Bankruptcy Group, P.C..


1 week 1 day ago

When tax season rolls around, people and families look forward to receiving and spending their federal tax refund. It is not uncommon for people to rely on their tax refund to pay-off debts or other household expenses. Sometimes, the refund is just some old fashion spending money. However, people in California who filed for bankruptcy […]
The post Will I Get My Tax Refund if I Filed for Bankruptcy in California? appeared first on The Bankruptcy Group, P.C..


1 week 2 days ago

This article originally appeared in politicalsay on February 19, 2021 at https://politicsay.com/ag-letitia-james-wont-sue-nyc-over-taxi-medallion...

AG Letitia James won’t sue NYC over taxi medallion debt

New York Attorney General Letitia James has abandoned her threat to sue New York City into providing financial relief to taxi drivers burdened by debt from medallions purchased at inflated costs at city-sponsored auctions, her office said Thursday.

James had threatened to sue last February — warning the city and its Taxi and Limousine Commission that it had 30 days to fork over the money.

But 30 days came and went and James did not take action. On Thursday, her office argued a lawsuit would take years to settle, delaying financial benefits for drivers.

Instead, James has endorsed a proposal from the New York Taxi Worker’s Alliance to write medallion loans down to $125,000.

“This proposal would provide a fiscally fair and responsible way to support the recovery of the taxi medallion industry by guaranteeing loans written down to no more than $125,000, which is why I have been working with the city to approve it since last year,” James said in a statement to Crain’s.

“This relief package not only lays out the best way to support the needs of a community that has been economically devastated right now without burdensome and drawn-out litigation, but will help to ensure justice is finally delivered for thousands of medallion owners.”

Last year’s threat to sue came after an investigation by the AG’s office concluded that the city made “over $855 million” off medallion auctions between 2002 and 2014, despite knowing as early as 2011 that the medallions were selling at higher than their actual value.

Drivers have demonstrated for months in support of NYTWA’s relief proposal. A competing plan from U.S. Congressman Ritchie Torres (D-The Bronx) proposed to re-peg the value of medallions at $250,000.

NYTWA Director Bhairavi Desai lamented the decision not to pursue the city in court, but welcomed James’ support for her group’s bailout plan.

“We know it’s because of technicalities and status of limitations, but it doesn’t make it less painful and infuriating that so many ex-city officials have gotten away with destroying drivers’ lives,” Desai told The Post.

“Our proposal is the only way forward, not just for survival but also for an ounce of justice.


1 week 3 days ago

The Chapter 13 bankruptcy trustee appointed to your case oversees the administration of the plan. In this article, we’ll list down the tasks of a trustee and how payment is carried out.
Chapter 13 in Brief
Among the different types of bankruptcy, Chapter 13 is also known as reorganization bankruptcy, or the wage earner’s plan. Under this bankruptcy chapter, you can keep your property and prevent foreclosure.
Individuals with regular income develop a plan to repay all or part of their debts. Under this chapter, debtors propose a repayment plan to make installments to creditors over three to five years. When you file for bankruptcy, bankruptcy court places an automatic stay, preventing further collection attempts. After the payment plan, dischargeable debts will be discharged.
To help in your decision to declare bankruptcy, it’s best to consult with bankruptcy lawyers.
Duties of a Chapter 13 trustee
Chapter 13 TrusteeReview the paperwork and repayment plan
One of the trustee’s tasks is to ensure that the repayment plan is fair to your creditors. 
The trustee will require you to submit certain documents like bank statements, paycheck stubs, and tax returns to confirm your financial disclosures. They will review these documents along with your bankruptcy petition.
Conduct the Meeting of Creditors
The Chapter 13 trustee administers a meeting of creditors around a month after the bankruptcy filing. 
The trustee will be asking questions regarding the plan and the paperwork, your assets, income, and other relevant information. The creditors may also ask questions.
Attend the Confirmation Hearing
If a lender or trustee takes issue with your plan, you’ll have a period to correct it or draft an opposition supporting the plan.
The trustee attends the confirmation hearing to tell the judge if they believe that the plan is possible. It’s the judge who rejects or approves the plan. 
Administer the Bankruptcy Repayment Plan
Within 30 days from your bankruptcy filing, you must start paying the bankruptcy trustee according to the proposed plan. It remains a proposal until court approval. In the meantime, the trustee holds the funds for the debtor. When it’s approved, the trustee distributes it to your creditors.
During the time of your repayment plan, the trustee will keep making the payments and distributing them to pay off the amount owed. They must take account of all the payments made.
Object to Improper Creditor Claims
Creditors must provide proof of claim if they want to receive Chapter 13 funds. The proof must state the amount owed and documentation of the agreement.
How to Pay the Chapter 13 Trustee
As mentioned, even before approval, you must make payments to your trustee after filing for bankruptcy.
Once you know the trustee’s name, check their website for payment instructions. If the creditor’s meeting is scheduled for less than a month after filing, the trustee will probably explain how payments work then. 
Continuing Payments
Once the plan is approved, you’ll be making payments as stated in the plan. You are to continue to mail the payments. Alternatively, a wage deduction order may be made to deduct from your paycheck to pay off your plan. Discuss with a bankruptcy lawyer to know exactly what will happen.
How the Chapter 13 Trustee Pays Your Creditors
Initial payments are usually just the attorney fees and secured claims, like car loans and mortgage payments, until the court signs the confirmation.
After the approval, payments made will include unsecured creditors – medical bills, credit card balances, and personal loans.
Ensure that Creditors Receive Trustee Bankruptcy Payments
Most trustees have a website where you can keep track of the accounting of payments you make to the trustee and its distribution to lenders.
Bankruptcy can impact your credit score. Our bankruptcy attorneys work with you using our proven credit repair system. Get the fresh start you and your family deserve and seek help from lawyers knowledgeable about bankruptcy law. Contact Vancouver WA Chapter 13 bankruptcy attorney Tom McAvity today by calling Northwest Debt Relief Law Firm to file bankruptcy. 
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