Blogs

7 hours 31 min ago

Celebrity Net Worth reports that Poo-Pourri inventor Suzi Batiz had filed for bankruptcy twice before becoming a millionaire with a successful business.
Batiz’s first bankruptcy stemmed from her desire to have financial freedom and success due to her impoverished childhood. At 19, Batiz bought a bridal shop in Arkansas. Unfortunately, her business went under due to no one wanting to buy the outdated bridal dress designs that she had purchased from the previous owner. She then had to file for bankruptcy before even turning 21 years old.
Bankruptcy number 2 came from her idea for a recruiting website that matched candidates with employers based on company culture. She heavily invested her own money into this idea. She also had several investors that told her they’d give her $5 million, but then backed out. The 2001 stock market crash left Batiz unable to pay off both her business and personal debt. She then filed for bankruptcy for the second time.
With two bankruptcies under her belt by 35, Batiz promised herself she would never take on debt or start another business again. Lucky for her, just 4 years later she broke that promise to herself. Now, she is one of the wealthiest self-made women in America after inventing the Poo-Pourri toilet spray.
In 2006, she came up with the idea of Poo-Pourri after someone stunk up the bathroom at a party she was at. In 2007, Poo-Pourri was officially ready to be sold in stores. A boutique owner in Dallas took a chance on Batiz’s product and asked if she could sell it in her store. By the end of her first year in business, Batiz had sold a quarter of a million bottles and was selling Pou-Pourri in small stores, and had a $1 million in revenue. 
From The Article:

“Then, in 2013, she realized she needed to do something to shake things up. The company had been in business for seven years and had $8 million in revenue the previous year. Competitors were popping up. She couldn’t afford a TV ad, but she could do an online video. She wanted to make fun of her product. “Girls Don’t Poop” was filmed for $25,000 and uploaded to YouTube in September 2013. She paid $650,000 to have it promoted on YouTube and Facebook. Within two weeks, the video had over 10 million views. Within a week she had $4 million worth of back orders for Poo-Pourri. Sales increased 80% to $27 million in 2014, the year after the video went viral. The video also paved the way for Poo-Pourri to be on the shelves of Bed, Bath & Beyond. So far in 2019, the company has a 108% year over year increase in first quarter sales to more than $16.5 million.”

Driven by her entrepreneurial mindset & creativity, Batiz didn’t let her failed businesses or bankruptcies stop her. She used them to learn from her mistakes and become one of the wealthiest self-made women in the United States.
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The post How The Texas-Based “Poo-Pourri” Inventor Recovered From Two Bankruptcies And Became A Millionaire appeared first on Allmand Law Firm, PLLC.



1 week 10 hours ago

The Krazy Coupon Lady shares 40 companies that will pay for a portion or all of your college tuition! Below are some examples:

  • Chipotle offers up to $5,250 for college costs: Full-time and part-time employees are eligible for the Chipotle Educational Assistance Program. The program provides up to $5,250 in tuition assistance per year, or they might even cover 100% depending on the degree. Plus, you can earn a third of your degree without going into a classroom, but how is this possible? Because every time you get a promotion, you’ll earn credit hours towards the degree.
  • Chick-fil-A’s Leadership Scholarship pays up to $25,000 for higher education: Chick-fil-A’s Remarkable Futures scholarship program offers two yearly scholarships. The True Inspiration Scholarship (worth $25,000) and the Leadership Scholarship (worth $2,500). The scholarship can be applied to any area of study at any accredited university, including two- and four-year colleges, online programs, and technical or vocational schools.
  • Intel’s tuition assistance program offers 100% reimbursement: Technology giant Intel provides its own in-house training organization called “Intel University” that offers over 7,000 courses to help foster workers’ career goals. Employees may also qualify for financial assistance for work-related courses outside of Intel as well. Intel’s tuition assistance program offers 100% of reimbursable costs including tuition, books, and certain fees.
  • Gap, Inc. reimburses up to $5,000/year: Employes of Gap, Inc. (Those who work at Gap, Banana Republic, Old Navy, & Athleta) are eligible for Gap’s tuition reimbursement program once they have worked at the company for a full year. Gap will then pay for two classes & two books per term with up to $5,000 per year.
  • Chevron will reimburse up to 75% of tuition costs: This company will pay a substantial 75% of your tuition fees if your course of study is related to your job track.
  • Chili’s covers up to 25% of your college tuition: Many college students work at restaurants to pay their rent and tuition while in college. Chili’s will cover up to 25% of your tuition costs if you’ve worked for Chili’s for at least three months and are working toward a job-related certificate or degree.
  • Allmand Law Firm’s yearly $1,000 scholarship: Every year, Allmand Law Firm awards $1,000 to the college student with the best short video regarding said year’s bankruptcy-related topic. P.S. Applications for the 2021 scholarship are open now and close on August 8th! Texas Bankruptcy Scholarship Details

To find more companies that will pay for your schooling, click the link below!
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The post Forget Student Loans: Here Are Companies That Will Pay For Your College Tuition appeared first on Allmand Law Firm, PLLC.



1 week 2 days ago

Clark Howard shares several amazing and simple ways you can make an extra $500 a week!

  1. Start Driving For Uber or Lyft: Driving people around can earn you a possible $15-16 an hour! Ride-hailing services are great for people going to and from the airport, people who do not have a car, etc. All you need to drive for Uber or Lyft is a valid driver’s license, a car with valid insurance, one year of driving experience, a 4-door vehicle that is less than 10 years old, and the ability to pass a background screening. Then, you’re all set to go!
  2. Deliver Groceries or Restaurant Food: There are a lot of food delivery services today. For example, DoorDash, GrubHub, Instacart, etc. Just like Uber & Lyft, the barrier to entry is so low that almost anyone can deliver food. The potential earnings to delivering food are $11-22 an hour! Most delivery services require a valid driver’s license, proof of auto insurance, no major recent violations or accidents, that you must have a smartphone, and that you must be able to carry 40 pounds. Since the COVID-19 Pandemic, the desire for food delivery services has increased majorly.
  3. Sell Your Used Clothes: You can sell your clothes anywhere nowadays. You can sell your clothes in person at a garage sale or you can sell them to second-hand shops like Plato’s Closet. You can also sell your clothes online on websites such as Depop, Etsy, and Facebook Marketplace. The desire to buy thrifted 90’s and Y2K clothes is growing right now because those clothes are in style right now. Don’t throw away your old clothes, sell them!
  4. Donate Plasma: Donate your plasma to potentially make $400 a month! This process takes about 90 minutes to do, but you can make great money and help save lives. In order to qualify for donating, you must be 18 years old and weigh more than 110 pounds.

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The post Ways You Can Make An Extra $500 A Week! appeared first on Allmand Law Firm, PLLC.



1 week 5 days ago

Also known as “liquidation,” Chapter 7 bankruptcies are the most common chapter of bankruptcy filed in the United States. On average, approximately 62% of all personal bankruptcy filings are Chapter 7 cases. Chapter 13 cases account for roughly 37% of personal bankruptcy filings. Less than 1% of the remaining cases filed are individual Chapter 11 […]
The post How Common is Chapter 7 Bankruptcy? appeared first on The Bankruptcy Group, P.C..


1 week 5 days ago

Chapter 13 is commonly referred to as a “wage earner” or “restructuring” bankruptcy. Debtors are permitted to reorganize their financial obligations, paying some debts through a three to five-month bankruptcy plan and potentially discharging some. While many people are eligible to file a Chapter 13 case, some requirements must be met. A potential filer must […]
The post What are the Qualifications for Chapter 13 Bankruptcy? appeared first on The Bankruptcy Group, P.C..


1 week 5 days ago

Arizona Residential Eviction Actions Procedures – effective July 15, 2021
IT IS ORDERED that the following procedures are applicable to eviction actions governed by Arizona Revised Statutes, Title 33, filed in the superior court or a justice court, and delayed by the moratoria, including the mortgage forbearance eviction moratorium currently in effect, or seeking judgment for unpaid rent accrued during an eviction moratorium.
IT IS FURTHER ORDERED beginning on the effective date of this Order, all other eviction cases shall be processed solely under Arizona statutes and rules, except as provided herein.
I. PLEADINGS
1. The plaintiff in a residential eviction action for non-payment of rent while an eviction moratorium was or is in effect must attest in the initial pleading or by other writing filed with the court and served on the defendant along with the initial pleading whether:
a. The claim is for any time between March 27, 2020 and July 24, 2020 and, if so, whether the property in which the defendant resided was covered under the CARES Act, during which time fees, penalties, or interest on unpaid rent may not be included in the amount claimed.
b. The rental is in a building with five or more units that had or has a mortgage backed by Fannie Mae or Freddie Mac (FHFA), the Federal Housing Administration (FHA), the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), or the Veterans
Administration (VA) for which the borrower was or is receiving mortgage forbearance relief.
c. The plaintiff has applied for or has received rental assistance from any source based on defendant’s rental obligation. If so, plaintiff must state in the pleading and the accounting of payments the amount received and how it has been applied toward the obligation and whether the plaintiff entered into any agreement releasing plaintiff’s claims against the defendant. The plaintiff must further attest to compliance with any agreement concerning the receipt of rental assistance to pay the defendant’s rental obligation, and that plaintiff is not seeking a judgment for a claim that was waived.
d. During an eviction moratorium, the plaintiff obtained a prior judgment against the defendant that has not been vacated. If so, the plaintiff must attest that the current amounts claimed exclude amounts awarded in the prior judgment.
II. CALENDARING FOR ALL CASES
1. A court should not schedule more than 25 eviction cases in an hour on the court’s calendar and shall allocate sufficient time for all parties appearing remotely or in person to present their evidence.
2. Each case shall be scheduled to be heard during a specific one-hour time slot, e.g., 9:00 A.M. – 10:00 A.M.
3. Courts should schedule any residential eviction action filed after the expiration of the CDC order within the time frames established by the Rules of Procedure for Eviction Actions and by applicable Arizona statutes, except, if necessary to manage court congestion, a court should follow the procedures established in Administrative Order No. 2021-109. Any continuance granted while the CDC order was in effect shall be honored and time shall be excluded.
4. When the limited availability of courthouse facilities, judicial officers, or court employees require prioritization, court proceedings shall be scheduled in the following order of priority: 1) eviction cases delayed by a moratorium; 2) newly filed eviction cases.
III. HEARINGS
1. Parties, attorneys, and witnesses in an eviction proceeding shall be permitted to participate remotely or in person.
2. At each hearing, the judge shall inquire as to whether the plaintiff entered into any agreement concerning the receipt of rental assistance to pay the defendant’s rental obligation or concerning forbearance relief described in section I, paragraph 1b of this Order. If all amounts awarded in a judgment have been paid in full by receipt of rental assistance or the plaintiff agreed to release defendant from all claims and causes of action, including judgments, writs, and other judicial relief for nonpayment of rent, the court shall vacate the judgment and deny an application for a writ of restitution. If the plaintiff received rental assistance payment and asserts that the rental agreement did not require waiver of all claims, the plaintiff shall provide the court with a copy of the rental assistance agreement. If the plaintiff agreed to delay eviction as a condition of a rental assistance or mortgage forbearance agreement, the court shall stay the action during the period of the delay.
3. With the agreement of the parties, the judge shall continue a proceeding to afford the parties the opportunity to apply for and receive rental assistance or to reach an agreement to resolve the case.
IV. PROCEDURES FOR RESTARTING EVICTION CASES DELAYED DUE TO FEDERAL AND STATE MORATORIA
1. In all cases where a plaintiff filed a complaint but was unable to obtain a judgment due to an eviction moratorium, the Court shall schedule a hearing. The plaintiff shall file a written motion to amend the complaint, as needed, to update the information required by section I paragraph 1 of this Order.
2. No later than 90 days after the entry of this Order, a plaintiff who received a judgment where the writ of restitution date was delayed may file a motion to amend the judgment to collect any additional rental obligations accrued since the judgment was obtained. Also within this time, a plaintiff may file a new application for a writ of restitution to regain possession in which the plaintiff must attest that a new tenancy has not been established.
3. Motions to amend the judgment and applications for writs shall include or update any information required by section I paragraph 1 of this Order that was not provided in the original complaint. If a plaintiff received rental assistance, the plaintiff must file a motion to amend the judgment and an accounting of any payments received since the judgment was entered. The plaintiff shall serve the motion or application on the defendant either personally or by posting the notice on the main entrance to the premises.
4. The court shall set a hearing on all motions for amended judgment. The court shall set a hearing on an application for a writ if it appears to the court that a new tenancy may have been established, that the judgment should be amended, or if the court finds that a hearing is appropriate based upon the court’s own motion or a motion of a party. The court shall issue a notice of hearing for the parties to appear not more than six nor less than three days from the date of the notice. At least three days before the hearing, the court shall mail a copy of the notice to the defendant and attempt to contact the defendant by telephone, text, or email to provide notice of the hearing, and the plaintiff shall serve a notice of the date, time, place and purpose of the hearing on the defendant either personally or by posting the notice on the main entrance to the premises. A defendant may respond in writing before the hearing and orally at the hearing.
5. No later than 90 days after the entry of this Order, for cases where a judgment was entered for rent owed during a moratorium, the amount owed was fully paid through a rental assistance agreement, and that judgment has not already been amended or vacated as permitted by this Order, a defendant may file a motion to compel satisfaction of judgment. The defendant may file the motion to compel without showing the plaintiff cannot be located, as described in Rule 4(d), Rules of Procedure for Eviction Procedures. The motion shall be served on the plaintiff. The court may, after an opportunity for a hearing, order that the judgment shall be deemed satisfied.
6. If an eviction judgment includes claims for rent due between March 27, 2020 and July 24, 2020 or if fees, penalties, or interest for unpaid rent during that period were awarded, the plaintiff shall provide proof that the property is not subject to a mortgage, or provide the written response from a Qualified Written Request (QWR) submitted to the property’s mortgage holder that confirms the financing in place was not covered by the CARES Act.
7. At the hearing on the motion to amend the judgment, for good cause, the court shall amend the eviction judgment to reflect:
a) Any unpaid rent, late fees, or interest that would have been due under the terms of the lease that was the subject of the eviction for the period since the judgment was entered if requested by the plaintiff and not to exceed the jurisdiction of the court.
b) Any rental assistance received from any source based on the defendant’s rental obligation.
c) Any fees, penalties or interest for unpaid rent from March 27, 2020 through July 24, 2020 not permitted to be collected under the CARES Act.
d) Any fees, penalties or interest for unpaid rent for any period of time the plaintiff was in a federal mortgage forbearance relief program which prohibited those assessments.
Nothing in this provision precludes a landlord from pursuing a claim not barred by a rental assistance agreement in a small claim or civil lawsuit.
8. The order issuing a writ may be executed by the constable or sheriff no earlier than five calendar days after the date of the order. The order shall state the earliest date on which execution may occur.

bankruptcy  (Link to entire court order)

.fusion-body .fusion-builder-column-1{width:100% !important;margin-top : 0px;margin-bottom : 0px;}.fusion-builder-column-1 > .fusion-column-wrapper {padding-top : 0px !important;padding-right : 0px !important;margin-right : 1.92%;padding-bottom : 0px !important;padding-left : 0px !important;margin-left : 1.92%;}@media only screen and (max-width:980px) {.fusion-body .fusion-builder-column-1{width:100% !important;}.fusion-builder-column-1 > .fusion-column-wrapper {margin-right : 1.92%;margin-left : 1.92%;}}@media only screen and (max-width:640px) {.fusion-body .fusion-builder-column-1{width:100% !important;}.fusion-builder-column-1 > .fusion-column-wrapper {margin-right : 1.92%;margin-left : 1.92%;}}@media only screen and (max-width:980px) {.fusion-title.fusion-title-1{margin-top:15px!important; margin-right:0px!important;margin-bottom:0px!important;margin-left:0px!important;}}@media only screen and (max-width:640px) {.fusion-title.fusion-title-1{margin-top:10px!important; margin-right:0px!important;margin-bottom:10px!important; margin-left:0px!important;}}MUSINGS BY DIANE:evictionCOVID has made the last 14 months a very tough time for everyone, but especially those who are facing eviction.  The sad truth is that hundreds of thousands of federal and state dollars go unused by tenants and their landlords.  Agencies are doing their best to reach out to anyone who needs help.  One such organization is the Arizona Foundation for Legal Services & Education.  See www.AZLawHelp.org for information, including their Legal Hotline: 866-611-6022. 
This site is not just for COVID-19 information.  They offer court forms and information about representing yourself in court.  Lots of questions and answers.  Even a program for “Savvy Seniors”.  There are links to housing organizations, Women’s Fresh Start Center, the Bankruptcy Court Self-Help Center, and much more.
Please check out the resources before you give up and assume there is no help.
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.fusion-body .fusion-builder-column-5{width:75% !important;margin-top : 0px;margin-bottom : 20px;}.fusion-builder-column-5 > .fusion-column-wrapper {padding-top : 0px !important;padding-right : 15px !important;margin-right : 10px;padding-bottom : 0px !important;padding-left : 15px !important;margin-left : 10px;}@media only screen and (max-width:980px) {.fusion-body .fusion-builder-column-5{width:100% !important;order : 0;}.fusion-builder-column-5 > .fusion-column-wrapper {margin-right : 10px;margin-left : 10px;}}@media only screen and (max-width:640px) {.fusion-body .fusion-builder-column-5{width:100% !important;order : 0;}.fusion-builder-column-5 > .fusion-column-wrapper {margin-right : 10px;margin-left : 10px;}}.fusion-body .fusion-flex-container.fusion-builder-row-4{ padding-top : 0px;margin-top : 5;padding-right : 0px;padding-bottom : 0px;margin-bottom : 20px;padding-left : 0px;}
The post Update on Arizona Eviction Proceedings – July, 15, 2021 appeared first on Diane L. Drain - Phoenix Arizona Bankruptcy Attorney.


2 weeks 2 days ago

Sportskeeda reports that Social Gloves Entertainment may be filing for bankruptcy after failing to pay the fighters from the most recent Youtubers vs. TikTokers amateur boxing match. The headlining fight featured family vlogger Austin McBroom vs. TikToker Bryce Hall. Several other famous Youtubers and TikTokers went head to head in the boxing ring. Fans could watch their favorite social media stars fight by purchasing it via pay-per-view.
While some fighters & fans predicted the social media event would break pay-per-view records, Fight HubTV founder Marcos Villegas is claiming the event sold only 136,000 pay-per-view purchases.
Even more shocking, news just came to light that headliner Austin McBroom owns a majority of Social Gloves Entertainment. McBroom has been vocal about how the pay-per-views purchases are actually much higher than what is being reported. McBroom has not yet discussed the possible bankruptcy or the fact that none of the boxers have been paid yet.
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The post Social Gloves Entertainment Rumored To Be Filing Bankruptcy After Failing To Pay Fighters appeared first on Allmand Law Firm, PLLC.



4 weeks 5 hours ago

Yahoo! Entertainment reports that TanaCon organizer, Michael Weist, filed for bankruptcy after his company, Good Times Entertainment organized the failed social media convention.
What Is TanaCon?
Entrepreneur Michael Weist took on the last-minute social media convention, TanaCon, a convention hosted by popular YouTuber Tana Mongeau. Mongeau created TanaCon after the popular social media convention VidCon refused to give Mongeau a “featured creator” pass, denying her personal security to protect her from mobs of fans. Upset with how VidCon treated her, Mongeau intentionally hosted TanaCon a few minutes away from VidCon on the same weekend. Mongeau marketed her event as completely free, with additional VIP tickets convention-goers could buy as well.
Resembling the infamous Fyre Festival, TanaCon was not what it seemed and left many people angry and demanding a refund. The convention was overbooked and many convention-goers who got tickets were unable to get into the venue, standing outside in the hot sun for hours.
When looking further into the mess of a convention, fans wondered if it was Weist’s fault, Mongeau’s fault, or a combination of both their faults. Both Weist and Mongeau completely blame each other and have continued to since the event occurred.
TanaCon Aftermath
After TanaCon, both Mongeau & Weist received plenty of backlash. The failed convention was heavily reported on by the YouTube community. There were even rumors of a class-action lawsuit against Weist & his company, Good Times Entertainment. Since then, Mongeau has been able to bounce back on YouTube unlike Weist, who had his reputation completely ruined and was forced to file for Chapter 7 bankruptcy.
Recently, Weist appeared on Dr. Phil to clear his name. A few of Weist’s former employees spoke on the show in an effort to support Mongeau. They said that Weist had been a terrible boss and TanaCon had been a mess since the beginning, citing it as Weist’s fault.
In addition to all the other accusations, Weist’s former assistant has now accused him of pocketing $35,000 in funds meant for a business venture and then filing for bankruptcy before paying him back.
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The post TanaCon Organizer, Michael Weist, Files Chapter 7 Bankruptcy After Failed Convention appeared first on Allmand Law Firm, PLLC.



1 month 1 day ago

Supreme Court Says Being Listed as a Terrorist is ‘No harm.’ Last Friday, in a case called TransUnion v Ramirez, the Supreme Court said the Fair Credit Reporting Act cannot give you the right to sue TransUnion for putting your name on their OFAC terrorist warning list. Led by Justice Brent Kavanaugh, a 5 to […]
The post Supreme Court Says Being Listed as a Terrorist is ‘No harm.’ by Robert Weed appeared first on Northern VA Bankruptcy Lawyer Robert Weed.


1 month 1 day ago

Supreme Court Says Being Listed as a Terrorist is ‘No harm.’ Last Friday, in a case called TransUnion v Ramirez, the Supreme Court said the Fair Credit Reporting Act cannot give you the right to sue TransUnion for putting your name on their OFAC terrorist warning list. Led by Justice Brent Kavanaugh, a 5 to […]
The post Supreme Court Says Being Listed as a Terrorist is ‘No harm.’ by Robert Weed appeared first on Northern VA Bankruptcy Lawyer Robert Weed.


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